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Ancient Cryptography » General » Other Mysteries » Rayburn Cypher

Author Topic: Rayburn Cypher  (Read 9452 times)

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Aaron

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #20 on: December 05, 2007, 11:58:20 AM »
Hmmm... well, remixing is technically computer music, not internet music, but it does sound interesting. Maybe several messages were "remixed" into one message?

Don Crownover

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #21 on: December 05, 2007, 07:06:29 PM »
Mixing messages is possible, though it would be tough to find out, if the material was on his computer. I was thinking more along the lines that the codes might not be a hidden message, but maybe just a way to hide where he has been looking. DC

ninochirco

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #22 on: December 09, 2007, 10:24:01 AM »
(excuse for my english, but I am italian  :-)  )
I have some meditation i wish to share with you.
What do you think about the line inside every letter?
I think this is a simple method to remember the case (lower or upper) of the letter;
So the 'i'  in second line six position is intended like 'I', the 'e' in four line seven position is intended like 'E' and the 'r' in line ten position seven is intended like 'R'. All other letters are correctly rappresented.
This scenery seems like a group of case-sensitive password;
Moreover, the total of letters are 64 ( in the main part),  and 64, in computer science, is a 'special' number; it is also 4 multiple, and this clue remind me the 'base64' code. In base64 every group of 3 byte is codified inside 4 byte so a binary message can be transferred over internet without the effect that some special characters (like ESC or other) can activate inside application.
So, all the (64) letters can be a key for some application that provide a ciphering of portion of hard disk ( or entire).

Stun90

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #23 on: December 09, 2007, 08:36:42 PM »
Ninochirco, No need to apologize for your English. Good for you that you are bi-lingual. Your first language is one of the "romantic" languages.   Next, that is a very good view of the code. Have you ever followed up on your ideas? If so. please tell us. If not, do you need assistance of any kind in working with the cypher? I started this thread and I am sure that others here are more than willing to help also. Thanks for the insight.
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
- Albert Einstein

Aaron

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #24 on: December 09, 2007, 10:33:19 PM »
The letters could be broken down into binary, making for a 256-bit encryption code. At that point, "all" you would need to do is find out the two primes that multiply to create that code. Of course, there's still the question of what it was used to encrypt (the stuff in the margins, perhaps?).

Or, a much better possibility is that it's a 64-bit encryption key on the margins (16 letters!) and the text in the middle is the actual message, with corrections. Now, the question remains as to what the symbols stand for number-wise.

Or it could have nothing at all to do with RSA, but you have to admit that 16 letters in the margins * 4 = 64 letters total, the main body of the message. So I still strongly suspect that the margins are an encryption key of some kind.
« Last Edit: December 09, 2007, 10:41:13 PM by Aaron »

Stun90

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #25 on: December 12, 2007, 07:19:59 PM »
Aaron do you think that it is an encription key to this cypher or is it just part of the cypher? Maybe a key to another cypher?
"If we knew what it was we were doing, it would not be called research, would it?"
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Aaron

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #26 on: December 12, 2007, 09:29:01 PM »
I'm leaning heavily towards the margins being the encryption key to the body of the message. If you'll notice, he made no mistakes with the margins, but there are "edits" here and there in the main body of the text. I'm guessing he was in a hurry when he was encrypting the message and made a few mistakes. The fact that the number of characters in the margins divides evenly into the body of the message is another strong reason why.

Of course, there's still the chance this is some kind of weird hoax, but I haven't found much new information on the Rayburn situation since January 2006. Has anyone found any newer information?

greengoshawk

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #27 on: April 26, 2008, 12:52:25 AM »
If you break it down by numeric value of items per line, you get 573-775-7878 which is an unpublished phone number for a person in Steelville Missouri. (I did a reverse phone search on whitepages.com) Just trying to look at it from a different view point.
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Aaron

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Re: Rayburn Cypher
« Reply #28 on: April 26, 2008, 07:06:13 AM »
Well I suppose that is one possibility... a secret friend of his that's holding onto any remaning clues / keepsakes.

And welcome to the forum! :)
« Last Edit: April 26, 2008, 07:07:12 AM by Aaron »